JULIOL 2018

Matrícula oberta

DESCRIPCIÓ

Els programes dels cursos d’estiu estan emmarcats en els nivells estàndard de l’EOI (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5+ i Avançat) equivalents als respectius nivells del Marc Europeu Comú de Referència), però s’adapten al màxim al perfil de cada grup, als interessos dels alumnes i a les seves possibilitats. No sempre és possible oferir els sis nivells en cadascun dels idiomes en els cursos d’estiu.

DURADA
Del 3/07/18 al 25/07/2018, ambdós inclosos

Clica sobre el curs al qual et vols matricular:

  • Cursos generals, matins, 60 hores: 

d'anglès  de 1r a C1  Llibres de text

d'alemany  de 1r a 3r

de francès  de 1r a 3r


Preus:

  • 266,80 € (cursos de 60 hores)

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English listenings

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RadioLab

Radiolab

Radiolab
  • Unraveling Bolero

    This week, we're throwing it back to an old favorite: a story about obsession, creativity, and a strange symmetry between a biologist and a composer that revolves around one famously repetitive piece of music.

    Anne Adams was a brilliant biologist. But when her son Alex was in a bad car accident, she decided to stay home to help him recover. And then, rather suddenly, she decided to quit science altogether and become a full-time artist. After that, her husband Robert Adams tells us, she just painted and painted and painted. First houses and buildings, then a series of paintings involving strawberries, and then... "Bolero."

    At some point, Anne became obsessed with Maurice Ravel's famous composition and decided to put an elaborate visual rendition of the song to canvas. She called it "Unraveling Bolero." But at the time, she had no idea that both she and Ravel would themselves unravel shortly after their experiences with this odd piece of music. Arbie Orenstein tells us what happened to Ravel after he wrote "Bolero," and neurologist Bruce Miller helps us understand how, for both Anne and Ravel, "Bolero" might have been the first symptom of a deadly disease.

     Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.

    Read more:

    Unravelling Bolero: progressive aphasia, transmodal creativity and the right posterior neocortex

    Arbie Orenstein's Ravel: Man and Musician

  • More or Less Human

    Seven years ago chatbots - those robotic texting machines - were a mere curiosity. They were noticeably robotic and at their most malicious seemed only capable of scamming men looking for love online. Today, the chatbot landscape is wildly different. From election interference to spreading hate, chatbots have become online weapons.

    And so, we decided to reinvestigate the role these robotic bits of code play in our lives and the effects they’re having on us. We begin with a little theater. In our live show “Robert or Robot?” Jad and Robert test 100 people to see if they can spot a bot. We then take a brief detour to revisit the humanity of the Furby, and finish in a virtual house where the line between technology and humanity becomes blurrier than ever before.

    This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler. Our live event was produced by Simon Adler and Suzie Lechtenberg.

    Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.

    Note from the Managing Editor:

    In the original version of our “More or Less Human” podcast, our introduction of neuroscientist Mavi Sanchez-Vives began with mention of her husband, Mel Slater. We’ve edited that introduction because it was a mistake to introduce her first as someone’s wife. Dr. Sanchez-Vives is an exceptional scientist and we’re sorry that the original introduction distracted from or diminished her work.  

    On a personal note, I failed to take due note of this while editing the piece, and in doing so, I flubbed what’s known as the Finkbeiner Test (all the more embarrassing given that Ann Finkebeiner is a mentor and one of my favorite science journalists). In addition to being a mistake, this is also a reminder to all of us at Radiolab that we need to be more aware of our blind spots. We should’ve done better, and we will do better.

     Soren Wheeler 

  • Dark Side of the Earth

    Astronauts at the International Space Station can make one request to talk to an earthling of their choice. For some reason, Astronaut Mark Vande Hei chose us. A couple weeks ago, we were able to video chat with Mark and peer over his shoulder through the Cupola, an observatory room in the ISS. Traveling at 17,000 miles an hour, we zoomed from the Rockies to the East Coast in minutes. And from where Mark sits, the total darkness of space isn’t very far away. 

    Talking to Mark brought us back to 2012, when we spoke to another astronaut, Dave Wolf. When we were putting together our live show In the Dark, Jad and Robert called up Dave Wolf to ask him if he had any stories about darkness. And boy, did he. Dave told us two stories that  became the finale of our show.

    Back in late 1997, Dave Wolf was on his first spacewalk, to perform work on the Mir (the photo to the right was taken during that mission, courtesy of NASA.). Dave wasn't alone -- with him was veteran Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Solovyev. (That's a picture of Dave giving Anatoly a hug on board the Mir, also courtesy of NASA).

    Out in blackness of space, the contrast between light and dark is almost unimaginably extreme -- every 45 minutes, you plunge between absolute darkness on the night-side of Earth, and blazing light as the sun screams into view. Dave and Anatoly were tethered to the spacecraft, traveling 5 miles per second. That's 16 times faster than we travel on Earth's surface as it rotates -- so as they orbited, they experienced 16 nights and 16 days for every Earth day.

    Dave's description of his first spacewalk was all we could've asked for, and more. But what happened next... well, it's just one of those stories that you always hope an astronaut will tell. Dave and Anatoly were ready to call it a job and head back into the Mir when something went wrong with the airlock. They couldn't get it to re-pressurize. In other words, they were locked out. After hours of trying to fix the airlock, they were running out of the resources that kept them alive in their space suits and facing a grisly death. So, they unhooked their tethers, and tried one last desperate move.

    In the end, they made it through, and Dave went on to perform dozens more spacewalks in the years to come, but he never again experienced anything like those harrowing minutes trying to improvise his way back into the Mir.

    After that terrifying tale, Dave told us about another moment he and Anatoly shared, floating high above Earth, staring out into the universe... a moment so beautiful, and peaceful, we decided to use the audience recreate it, as best we could, for the final act of our live show.

    Pilobolus creates a shadow astronaut during Dave Wolf's story on stage (photo by Lars Topelmann):

    The audience turns Portland's Keller auditorium into a view of outer space with thousands of LED lights (photo by Lars Topelmann):

    Here's Dave Wolf in the dark darkness of space, performing a spacewalk in 2009 (courtesy of NASA):

    To give you an idea of what it looks like during the brightness of day, here's another photo taken in 2009 -- more than a decade after the adventure described in our podcast -- this time of astronaut Tom Marshburn (Dave Wolf is with him, out of frame, photo courtesy of NASA):

    This episode was produced by Matt Kielty and Soren Wheeler. 

    Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.